Acoustical Walls

Are you trying to improve sound quality in a conference, meeting rooms, or an auditorium? Are you building a recording studio, or trying to soundproof an office space? Are you trying to reduce echoes or industrial noise in a work environment or restaurant? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then Acoustic Specialties has the answer for you – acoustical wall treatments.

What are acoustical panels?

Acoustical panels use fiberglass or mineral fiber as a substrate covered in a fabric of your choice. There are a host of fabrics companies such as Carnegie and Guilford of Maine just to name two that can provide you with many choices. After a substrate and fabric has been chosen the panels can be pre constructed at the factory and can be hung on the wall by a few different methods depending on the application. A much more versatile approach is the stretch wall system. These panels are constructed on site on the wall. The advantages of stretch wall panels are the fabric can be replaced or changed without having to replace the whole panel. The panels are functional and aesthetically appealing as you desire. There are also diffuser panels constructed from wood. These panels are designed to adjust the tone of an auditorium or theater. When sound is absorbed by or reflected by the panels, it allows the sound waves to be controlled for your application. When designed properly sounds are as you desire. Conversations are easier to understand, and sound quality from speakers and instruments is vastly improved. In a noisy work environment, acoustical panels will reduce the overall harshness of the noise, making work more pleasant for everyone who shares the space.

Where should I place acoustical panels?

Acoustic Specialties approach is first and foremost to follow the acoustical engineer design if applicable. If engineering is necessary Acoustic Specialties can provide one for you. If the space has not been engineered the positioning is not complex. Our goal is to achieve the most noise reduction with the fewest number of panels. I call this the minimalists approach.